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Roger Weller, geology instructor

wellerr@cochise.edu

Staurolite
by Keriann Grisham
Physical Geology
Fall 2009
  

Staurolite

 

                                               Photo Courtesy of Roger Weller/Cochise College and the National History Museum

 

What is It?

            Staurolite is a dull brown silicate mineral that is known to change. Its name comes from the Greek word, stauros that means cross, and lithos referring to the interlocking crystals it forms. This mineral rates a 7-7.5 on the Moh’s Scale of Hardness, and is recognized by its ability to form crystals in the shape of a cross.

The unique quality of Staurolite is that it forms crystals, which cross each other at 60 and 90-degree angles. The most familiar type is the 60-degree crystal, however, the 90-degree crystals are the ones that people look for the most. Staurolite also goes by another name called the “fairy stone”.
 

                                                                    Drawings Courtesy of Roger Weller/Cochise College

              

 

                                                                                Photo Courtesy of Roger Weller/Cochise College

 

Uses

                Along with it being a collector’s item, it is also used to make necklaces. Some people also believe that this mineral is good luck charm, and that it has healing properties. Its no surprise that this mineral is highly coveted, as well as a shame to the fact that no ones interested in the 60 degree angle crystals, that don’t get much recognition at all.

 

Where is it Found?

                It can be found in places like Virginia, Montana, Georgia and Russia. The best place to find staurolites, however, is in Patrick County, Virginia. This is because this state has a park open to the public were people may go hunting for free for this precious mineral. Staurolite also happens to be the official state mineral of Georgia. 

 

Indian Legend

                Long ago people told a sad story to the Cherokee Indians. It was about this man full of kindness, wisdom, and who taught people the right path, which led to peace. They told them that although he taught of peace, he had enemies, which refused to listen to the message, resulting in the man being tortured and killed.

            After the Indians heard this story they began to sing a song in honor of this man, whom they called The Son of The Creator. The animals came beside them, and the Indians cried, being filled with great sorrow. After they cried they noticed that their tears turned the stones beneath them into cross -shaped stones. The Cherokee always honored these rocks, and were thankful that they had been given this gift, allowing them to always remember the story of the man. 

 

Works Cited

http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/staurolite

http://www.exceptionalminerals.com/tucson2008.htm

http://www.galleries.com/minerals/silicate/staurolite/stauroli/stauroli.htm

http://www.littlefallsmn.com/crossrocks.php

http://web.dps.k12.va.us/gibson/roadside_geology/fairystone.htm