Cochise College          Photos of Minerals

                          Geology Home Page                

                          Roger Weller, geology instructor

                          wellerr@cochise.edu
                                  copyright 2006-R.Weller
 

Mineral Information on:
chrysocolla

Chemical Group:    silicate

Chemical Formula:   
CuSiO3.2H2O   

Color:  green or blue                  Streak:  white

Luster:   vitreous or waxy
 

Hardness:   2 to 4         Specific Gravity:   2 to 2.5          

Cleavage:  none                 Fracture: conchoidal

 

Crystal Forms and Habits:  Orthorhombic system
     Crystals are extremely rare and very small

Mineral Associations:  commonly found with malachite and tenorite,
     sometimes with azurite. 
     Most of what is called chrysocolla is really chalcedony with chrysocolla.
     Chrysocolla also occurs as pseudomorphs after azurite crystals.

Identifying Characteristics:  waxy blue surface, often showing desiccation cracks.

Uses:  minor ore of copper
    If solid enough it becomes a nice gemstone

Occurrences: 
USA occurrences
Arizona
     Miami and Inspiration
     Globe
     Bagdad
     Cole Shaft, Bisbee
Harquahala Mountains
WORLD-WIDE occurrences 
Chile
England
     Cornwall
France
Russia
     Ural Mountains

Toxicity:      when-swallowed- low         when inhaled- high

Additional Information:

Chrysocolla comes from the words chryso (gold) and kolla (glue);  the name is in
reference to a process in which minute specks of gold were attached to jewelry using
powdered chrysocolla and an organic glue.  When heated, copper was released
which then formed an alloy with the gold.